All in the Name…

14th December

  Indigo is one of the oldest textile dyes, believed to have been used more than any other dye throughout history. It comes from a large genus of about seven hundred species of tropical herbs and flowering plants that principally thrive in tropical and arid zones of the world. Many different cultures over time have...

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artist inspiration, celestial realm, Derek Jarman, Franz Marc, heavenly blue, John Keats, metaphysical power, Miro, musicians, painters, poets, Wassily Kadinksy, Yves Klein

How Blue Makes us Feel…

7th December

Blue has historically been incorporated into the design of paintings and churches for its heavenly associations, which was intended to make people feel the metaphysical power of the celestial realm. However, blue has often been called on by artists for inspiration into deeper meanings; for its psychological impact on mood and emotion, for its association...

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blue, blue pigment, calm, copper azurite, craft, Girl with a Pearl Earring, lapis lazuli, love of making, oil on canvas, shimmering, The Lacemaker, ultramarine, Vermeer

The Blue of Vermeer…

30th November

  The much loved seventeenth century Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer remains something of an enigma, even today.   After his death in 1675, unlike many artists, Vermeer did not leave behind any drawings or plans of his paintings, nor any diaries.  Yet we have come to recognise and relish the idyllic quality that Vermeer captures in...

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blue horizon, Blue Verditer, cobalt blue, Goethe, Indigo, John Ruskin, luminosity, oil on canvas, pigments, Prussian blue, The Fighting Temeraire, The Royal Academy of Arts, Theory of Colours, Turner, white sails

Watching the White Sails in the Heart of the Ocean…

23rd November

“Do we dream, or does the white forked sail drift nearer, and nearer yet, diminishing the blue sea between us with the fullness of its wings?” John Ruskin on Turner In The Fighting Temeraire, it has long been presumed that Turner’s viewpoint would have been the London Embankment, watching as the famous and victorious Temeraire ship...

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azure, beautiful shades of blue, blue flower, blue stone, cyan, Cyane, German Romantic literature, Hades, Heinrich von Ofterdingen, Isle of Skye, linocut, love, Novalis, Ovid, power of imagination, Proserpina, sapphire, silky fish, The Blue Bird, turquoise

A Shepherdess named Cyane…

15th November

  One of the most prevalent symbols to emerge from the German Romantic literature between the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries was that of an elusive Blue Flower, or Blaue Blume. This derived from the renowned novel of the period Heinrich von Ofterdingen, published posthumously in 1802 by author and philosopher Novalis. The story centres...

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ancient sculpture, blue, blue pigment, British Museum, cave paintings, cerulean blue, Cleopatra, drapery, Egyptian Blue, Egyptians, lapis lazuli, Mediterranean, pigment, tempera, turquoise

In The Beginning…

8th November

Blue is all around us.  As the renowned British presenter and naturalist Sir David Attenborough reminds us, our beautiful Earth is so abundant in oceans, it is often referred to as The Blue Planet.  Yet, as surrounded by blue as we are, it has not been the easiest colour from which to create pigment. Early...

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